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Posted By KinderLab Robotics On April 11, 2018

KinderLab Robotics Meets Rigorous Review Standards to Join STEMworks Database

KinderLab Robotics and STEMworks both aim to develop 21st-century skills by providing effective STEM education and inspiration

(Waltham, MA) April 11, 2018 — KinderLab Robotics, the creators of KIBO™, a robot kit designed to teach children ages 4–7 to build, program, decorate, and bring their own robot to life without requiring any screen-time, today announced its acceptance to STEMworks, an online honor roll of high-quality STEM education programs.

As the demand for STEM education continues to grow, many organizations have identified achievement gaps in STEM literacy based on gender, race, and economic inequalities. KinderLab Robotics seeks to increase STEM literacy and prepare young children for the demands of a 21st-century society that will require them to learn sequencing, think computationally, problem-solve, and collaborate. The overarching goal of offering students access to a plethora of tools and resources is to create a new population of young people who are STEM-literate, and to improve the economic competitiveness of our future workforce.

We are excited to be part of this group of programs that are providing students the tools they need to develop 21st-century skills,” said Mitch Rosenberg, the CEO of KinderLab Robotics, Inc. “KinderLab Robotics and the other STEMworks programs have similar goals of reducing inequality and providing young students access to high-quality STEM tools. Our acceptance to STEMworks provides us the opportunity to introduce our award-winning, researched-based STEM programs to child care centers, public and private schools, libraries and museums, and more.

Since 2010, STEMworks has worked with national and state education leaders to bring the most effective STEM education programs to hundreds of thousands more students every year. STEMworks provides a mechanism for identifying programs that go beyond impressive marketing materials to provide truly effective STEM education and inspiration. Programs listed in STEMworks have been rigorously reviewed for effectiveness using research-based design principles.

KinderLab Robotics can be very proud of joining the STEMworks honor roll,” said Dr. Mark Loveland, Project Director for STEMworks. “The level of effort involved in completing an application that clearly communicates both impact and inspiration is no small task.

KinderLab Robotics’ KIBO programs establish a passion for STEM education at a very young age, when children are excited to learn and are less distracted by gender, sports, or peer pressure. To learn more about KIBO and KinderLab Robotics, click here.

About KinderLab Robotics, Inc.

KinderLab Robotics is the creator of KIBO, a robot kit based on 15 years of child development research, that enables young children to build, program, decorate, and run their own robot. Developed specifically for teachers by Professor Marina Umaschi Bers at Tufts University, KIBO is used in all fifty states and 52 countries, and has proven efficacy in helping kids learn STEAM—and getting them excited about it! KinderLab offers a complete suite of teaching materials that help integrate STEAM elements into a wide range of curricula, including reading literacy, cultural studies, and art. For more information, please visit KinderLabRobotics.com.

About STEMworks

STEMworks is a searchable online honor roll of high-quality science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education programs. STEMworks helps companies, states, and individuals make smart investments in their communities by evaluating and cataloging programs that meet rigorous and results-driven design principles. In November of 2017, STEMworks was acquired by WestEd, a nonpartisan, nonprofit research, development, and service agency that partners with education and other communities throughout the United States and abroad to promote excellence, achieve equity, and improve learning for children, youth, and adults. For more information, please visit stemworks.wested.org.

Press Contact
Julia Brolin
PR with Panache!
(612) 669-2456
[email protected]

Posted By KinderLab Robotics On February 27, 2018

KinderLab Robotics Launches Four New Curriculum Guides

The guides for teachers offer 40 hours of integrated STEAM activities that inspire students to explore and learn with the KIBO robot’s expansion modules (Waltham, MA) February 28, 2018 — KinderLab Robotics has expanded its KIBO™ curriculum suite by announcing four new Curriculum Guides. In addition to Creating with KIBO, the company’s 40-hour core curriculum Read More

Posted By KinderLab Robotics On November 15, 2017

KinderLab Robotics Announces New Marker Extension Set for KIBO Robot Kit

New accessory enables young children to program their KIBO robot to draw, developing STEAM skills (Waltham, MA) November 15, 2017 — KinderLab Robotics has expanded its KIBO™ family of products by announcing the new Marker Extension Set, which enables the KIBO robot to draw as it moves. Children using KIBO can use code to create Read More

Posted By KinderLab Robotics On October 19, 2017

KIBO from KinderLab Robotics wins 2017 Parents’ Choice Gold Award in the Toy Category

Unique robot kit helps young children develop STEM skills and confidence (Waltham, MA) October 19, 2017 — KIBO™, a robot kit specifically designed for young children aged 4-7 years old, has been named a GOLD winner of the 2017 Parents’ Choice Award® in the Toy category. KIBO is the only robot available that allows children Read More

Posted By KinderLab Robotics On September 12, 2017

New Book Explores Coding, Creating, and Play in Early Childhood

In Coding as a Playground, Dr. Marina Umaschi Bers offers research-based evidence for teaching kids STEAM topics and collaboration (Waltham, MA) September 12, 2017 — Dr. Marina Umaschi Bers is pleased to announce the immediate availability of her newest book focused on how and why to teach computational thinking in early childhood. Coding as a Read More